Last edited by Aragar
Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

2 edition of Incardination and excardination of seculars found in the catalog.

Incardination and excardination of seculars

James Thomas McBride

Incardination and excardination of seculars

an historical synopsis and commentary

by James Thomas McBride

  • 7 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Catholic Church.,
  • Incardination (Canon law),
  • Excardination (Canon law)

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby James Thomas McBride.
    SeriesCanon law studies / Catholic University of America -- no. 145
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBX1939.I44 M3
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxx, 595 p. ;
    Number of Pages595
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18608162M

    Frequently Asked Questions regarding THE INCARDINATION OF A CLERIC MEMBER. Can. A diocesan administrator cannot grant excardination or incardination or even permission to move to another particular church unless the episcopal see has been vacant for a year and he has the consent of the college of consultors. LETTER OF INCARDINATION AND FACULTIES [Date] [Deacon or Priest Name] Address City/St/Zip Dear Reverend [name] You are hereby incardinated into the [name of diocese or other episcopal ministry] and I receive you into my episcopal care under the ordinary ecclesiastical authority granted me as a bishop ordinary ofFile Size: 29KB.

    The Priests’ Handbook Priests are to abstain from (a) the use of alcohol when working with youth and from (b) the possession or use of illegal drugs at all times. In accord with canon , incardination that is called “of origin” may be changed to incardination called “derived,” which requires an administrative act containing a letter of excardination of the bishop of the diocese of origin (called a quo) and a letter of incardination of the bishop of .

    Ordination and Incardination General considerations The Apostolic Episcopal Church welcomes enquiries from men who wish to explore a calling to the Diaconate or Priesthood in its communion, or as a lay evangelist, and women who are called to the ministry of a Deaconess. Incardination refers to a member of the clergy being placed under the jurisdiction of a particular bishop or other ecclesiastical superior. Its antonym, excardination, denotes that a member of the clergy has been freed from one jurisdiction and is transferred to another.


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Incardination and excardination of seculars by James Thomas McBride Download PDF EPUB FB2

Incardination and Excardination of Seculars: A Historical Synopsis and Commentary Paperback – Janu by James Thomas McBride (Author)5/5(1).

Incardination and Excardination of Seculars () (CUA Studies in Canon Law) [Mcbride, Thomas] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Incardination and Excardination of Seculars () (CUA Studies in Canon Law)Price: $ Stanford Libraries' official online search tool for books, media, journals, databases, government documents and more.

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[James Thomas McBride]. For a cleric already incardinated to be incardinated validly in another particular church, he must obtain from the diocesan bishop a letter of excardination signed by the same bishop and a letter of incardination from the diocesan bishop of the particular church in which he desires to be incardinated signed by that bishop.

Incardination and Excardination. From the Catholic Encyclopedia (Lat. cardo, a pivot, socket, or hinge--hence, incardinare, to hang on a hinge, or fix; excardinare, to unhinge, or set free). In the ecclesiastical sense the words are used to denote that a given person is freed from the jurisdiction of one bishop and is transferred to that of another.

From these decrees of the Council of Trent canonists deduce that for excardination to be lawful there must exist a just cause. Moreover, letters of excardination are absolutely valueless unless at the same time there is a corresponding incardination into another diocese, lest the cleric wander about Incardination and excardination of seculars book quasi perdita et errans" (Decret.

Excardination is the full and perpetual transference of a given person from the jurisdiction of one bishop to that of another. Incardination is canonical and perpetual enlistment in the new diocese to which a given person has been transferred by letters of excardination.

Incardination, in short, is the foundation of the relationship between a bishop and his priests. And when it comes to a priest’s ministry, it is the bishop who decides what that will be.

The bishop assigns the clergy of his diocese to particular roles, and priests must undertake those assignments out of obedience. A priest does not make his own decision about where and how he will exercise.

The letter of excardination has no legal effect unless and until the priest has obtained a letter of incardination from his new superior. This is to ensure that no cleric is ever without a place of incardination, even for a brief moment. Incardination is the formal term in the Catholic Church for a clergyman being under a bishop or other ecclesiastical superior.

It is also sometimes used to refer to laity who may transfer to another part of the church, from say the Western Latin Church to an Eastern Catholic Church or from a territorial diocese to one of the three personal ordinariates for former Anglicans.

Incardination does not cease until the moment when that cleric is incardinated as a subject of another superior. An excardination from one diocese, for instance, does not become effective until the moment of incardination to another, so there is no gap during which the clergyman is not clearly answerable to a definitely determined superior.

Incardination is canonical and perpetual enlistment in the new diocese to which a given person has been transferred by letters of excardination. It must be remembered that in canon law a person belongs to a bishop in any one or more of the four following ways: by birth, by benefice, by domicile, or by service.

The incardination of deacons is subject to the same norms as the incardination of transitional deacons. It is lost only by death, loss of the clerical state, or a process of excardination and incardination.

Deacons are bound by the obligations and enjoy the rights that come with incardination, the same as any other clergy. INCARDINATION PROCESS FOR PRIESTS. The process of incardination is based on canons of the Code of Canon Law. Below is an outline of the process followed in the Diocese of Las Cruces.

REQUIREMENTS. The priest must work in the diocese for four years before he will be accepted to begin the process for incardination. Size: 20KB. Can. For a cleric already incardinated to be incardinated validly in another particular church, he must obtain from the diocesan bishop a letter of excardination signed by the same bishop and a letter of incardination from the diocesan bishop of the particular church in which he desires to be incardinated signed by that bishop.

Incardination The ANCC welcomes with open arms qualified clergy to incardinate into the Church. Priests, deacons and those in religious life who wish to join us will find that the incardination process is professional, thorough and fair.

Together, the church and the candidate discern over time if the incardination would be mutually beneficial. ABSTRACT Canon§1 of the CIC calls for an agreement between the bishops a quo and ad quem for the temporary service of diocesan clerics outside their dioceses of incardination.

The purpose of the agreement is to determine and safeguard the rights and duties of the priests and bishops involved. Diocese of Davenport Deacon Handbook of Policies and Procedures 3 I.

Introduction The purpose of this handbook is to provide the deacons and priests of the diocese a clear understanding of the policies and procedures relating to the diaconate.

This information would also be useful for diocesan and parish staff and to the laity in Size: KB. This is the talk page for discussing improvements to the Incardination and excardination article.

This is not a forum for general discussion of the article's subject.: Put new text under old text. Click here to start a new topic.; Please sign and date your posts by typing four tildes (~~~~).; New to Wikipedia. Welcome. Ask questions, get answers.

Book II The People of God Part I Church Personnel [] - 1. Effective § INCARDINATION OF PRIESTS § A. PPLICATION. Policy. A priest seeking to incardinate in the Diocese of Springfield in Illinois shall send a written request to the Bishop.

Procedures. a) The written request for incardination should follow the."Incardination and Excardination of Seculars" (P) Dube, Arthur J. "The General Principles for the Reckoning of Time in Canon Law" (P) Swoboda, Innocent "Ignorance in Relation to the Imputability of Delicts" (P) Slafkosky, Andrew "The Canonical Episcopal Visitation of the Diocese" (P) Schmidt, JohnPhone: () Incardination and Excardination (Lat.

cardo, a pivot, socket, or hinge—hence, incardinare, to hang on a hinge, or fix; excardinare, to unhinge, or set free).

In the ecclesiastical sense the words are used to denote that a given person is freed from the jurisdiction of .